Why Photo Editing Is So Important


Obviously, if you are a professional or even amateur photographer, taking pictures is at the core of what you do and there’s no way you can achieve great results without having at least a decent image to begin with, no matter how much you edit that image to produce the final product or work of art. However, it could be argued successfully that editing makes up a hugely important part of what many photographers consider to be their true work.

This is why it’s important to start by getting the right software and hardware. There is a good reason that we focus heavily on this aspect of the work here on our blog, because a lot of your options as an editor in post production will come down to the capabilities of the computer put in front of you combined with your own skills manipulating the tools and images you have.

However, even this is only a part of the editing process. Before you even settle down to start editing pictures, you will need to go through several stages following the photoshoot itself. For example, your steps may include…

1) Initial evaluation of the images you’ve captured to get a sense of the overall tone and what you’ve been able to achieve.

2) Critiquing the set as a whole and planning what you need to do to improve these images for the final results.

3) Start rating each of your pictures to help narrow down your options, then move your top choices to another folder to view them in isolation.

4) Wait a while to allow yourself to look at the images with a fresh pair of eyes.

5) Make final selections and begin to consider post-production.

This may not be your exact process, but it would be wise to follow a similar one. Generally it may only be at this stage that you really start to get deeper into the artistic process and think about the results you hoped to achieve from the beginning. You may even draw inspiration from your own photographs and feel like making particular edits to emphasise different elements or take the project in a new direction. Don’t underestimate how much of your mindset and approach can be seen in the results of your photography and your editing work.